Law Enforcement Careers in Idaho

Idaho police training is available across the state in a variety of agencies. Law enforcement jobs in Idaho all share the common goal of serving and protecting the public at large with professionalism and respect. From state police to sheriff’s departments to local city police, their goal is to protect life and property while maintaining order.

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Idaho State Police

Police jobs in Idaho begin at the state level. Founded in 1919 when it was known as the Bureau of Constabulary, the Idaho State Police work for the population of their state, maintaining stability and enforcing the laws. Criminal investigations, work in forensic labs, driving patrols, and cooperation with other law enforcement agencies are all in a day’s work. In 2011 the state police arrested a total of 69,738 people.

Starting as a trooper, a state police officer can pursue training for further specialization as a detective, commercial vehicle expert, executive protection officer, and many other positions. Basic requirements are a high school diploma or GED and a relatively clean background from traffic violations, drugs, and criminal activity.

Sheriff’s Departments in Idaho

  • Ada County: This sheriff’s department is responsible for nearly every law enforcement function, including patrolling the waterways and roads, issuing permits and licenses, and participating in the local community.

There are currently 613 employees in this department, and to be considered for a position the candidate must not have smoked tobacco products within the past 11 months. To qualify for a deputy sheriff career the applicant must have a two-year AA degree, an equivalent amount of law enforcement experience, or four consecutive years of full time military experience. Non-deputy positions require a high school diploma or equivalent.

  • Bonneville County: Recently sheriff’s deputies chased a suspect for over eight hours in a high speed car, boat, and foot pursuit. Proof of high school graduation is required when applying to serve and preserve the peace of Bonneville County. Sheriffs provide legally mandated services in jails and courtrooms and protect people and property.
  • Bannock County: This sheriff’s department is responsible for coverage of 1,142 square miles and almost 70,000 people. 19 deputies currently provide 24-hour law enforcement assistance including a STAR Team (Special Tactics and Response) with special training for hostage situations. This sheriff’s department also includes special divisions in court services, detention, training, civil, support services, and a search and rescue unit. All deputies must be non-smokers and remain so throughout their term of employment.

Municipal Police Departments in Idaho

  • Boise: The Boise PD has a variety of teams dedicated to ensuring a quality public service, with everything from a pipes and drums division to a bomb squad to units assigned to public schools. In 2011 a total of 164,924 calls for service were placed to the Boise PD, which led to over 31,500 reports being written. Currently accepting applications for honest and ethical citizens who are 21 years of age or older, with at least 64 college credits or the equivalence of an Idaho Intermediate Certificate or higher.
  • Idaho Falls: The Idaho Falls PD is looking for deputy officers 21 years of age or older with a high school diploma or GED equivalent. Other requirements include a mostly clean criminal, driving, and illicit drug-use record, as well as basic hearing, sight, and fitness standards. Law enforcement careers in Idaho Falls are a great way to serve the local community.
  • Pocatello: The Pocatello PD offers a “reverse 911” program for its citizens, sending out automated messages by voice or text regarding localized emergencies to residents who sign up to participate. Recruiting for officers with a high school education or equivalent who can pass basic background and fitness tests.
  • Meridian: To combat the nation’s fastest growing drug problem – prescription drug abuse – the Meridian PD has created a program that allows residents to drop off old drugs at local police stations. The police department has bike, SWAT, traffic, and K-9 unit patrols and its principal goal is protect and preserve property and life.
  • Nampa: Each year the Nampa PD hosts the Snake River SWAT challenge where SWAT teams from different police departments come for weapons training and seminars. The event is topped off by a challenge course where SWAT teams compete amongst each other on an 8-10 mile challenge course. Employment as a deputy with the Nampa PD requires a high school diploma or equivalent with a preference given to those with at least 64 academic or technical college credits.

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